a dedicated space for curiosity

Posts Tagged ‘Consumer Culture’

Oh Christmas Tree

In Random Curiosities on 12/21/2010 at 20:54

This is my inflatable tree, courtesy of opera diva Barbara Thorson.
Takes less than 2 minutes to fill it.

Now that end-of-term grades are in,
it’s a quick-n-easy way for me to mark the shift in seasons.

What kind of tree do you have?

Somehow, I’ll bet it’s not like this one.

Feel free to post links to your tree photos in my comment box.
I’d love to see them…

Contest > Fill-In-Blank

In Random Curiosities on 11/20/2010 at 17:15

Winter approaches.  Perennials die–become unrecognizable.

Here’s the question:

The plant in the photo above is/was a _____________. Read the rest of this entry »

(R)Evolution: Wheelhouse

In About All Publications, About Hybrid Works on 09/18/2010 at 03:26

A burgeoning project on flowers and culture splits in two…

One half morphs into POP UP Poptagon–a collaboration with Dorothee Lang, published in Locus Novus last year. The other half starts with a query from Dorothee, who mails from Germany to my office in Vancouver.

“Shall we write some poems now?” she asks.

Words are crafted, then stored in a file. I travel to Calgary–work with designer Lawrence Eisler on illustrations to accompany the text. Meantime, back in Germany, Dorothee is curious about literary hypertext–she’s engaged in consultations with U.S. hypertext author Susan Gibb.

I eventually leave Calgary; return to Vancouver with a series of illustrated poems in hand. Dorothee–stoked about what she’s learned from Susan–writes, “Want to turn these poems into hypertext?”

“Why not?” I write back.

We craft more illustrations and poems, and, inevitably it’s more complex than that, but at the end of the day, here it is:

(R)Evolution: Wheelhouse Magazine
a hypercosmos by D. Lang + K. Eisler + L.  Eisler

Dorothee’s virtual notes on the process are here.

A review of (R)Evolution in Hypercompendia.

Note: He’s my brother, not my husband, if you’re wondering who Lawrence Eisler is.

~

Wheelhouse Magazine is a publication of the Wheelhouse Arts Collective: “a collection of wayward artists, many of whom are progressive activists, labor unionists, and dilettantes, stuck inside the cramped confines of a seafaring vessel’s main cabin. Luckily…We know where we’re going: towards land, specifically a land where art is defetishized (not appreciated but wrestled with) and politics is a civic duty, where the New Yorker is not the arbiter of literary history (and no, it’s not necessarily Canada). We come from New York, Philadelphia, the Midwest, and abroad. We cling together in cyberspace and are bounded by the covers of our books.”

The Fickle Consumer: PicFic

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 07/23/2010 at 15:07

I find contradictions between morality and ethics interesting–those disconnections that sometimes exist between a person’s notions of right and wrong (or good and bad) and their daily practice of living. Another curiosity is the extent to which people shift their morality retrospectively in light of their behavior and decisions. I find these topics even more compelling when the forces of consumer culture are factored in.

I explore these curiosities in a Twitter length story–140 characters or less. It appears in PicFic–a California-based picofiction online magazine.

Here it is → The Fickle Consumer

Secret Beef: 50 to 1

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 02/27/2010 at 20:09

I’ve written about secrets, and taken photos of paradox.

The challenge?

To combine these phenomena in a micro-story of 50 words exactly — no more, no less.

Not long ago, I observed a secret paradox close to home — it concerns business, humans, nonhuman animals, and eating habits.

The story appears in the weekly New Jersey-based e-zine 50 to 1. Editor, Glen Binger,  “posts only 50 word stories and first line inspirational sentences that are meant to get the reader hooked ...”

Here’s the link → Secret Beef

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Olympics Money

In Random Curiosities on 01/26/2010 at 04:04

Was chatting with a fellow passenger on the Canada Line. He offered to sell me four tickets to the Winter Olympic Games Opening Ceremony. Great seats: third row from the front at B.C. Place. He bought them for $1,100.- each when they first went on sale. The intent was to re-sell for a profit.

Now he’s asking $1,600.- per ticket. It’s easy math: $2,000.- in his pocket if he unloads them for the price he asks. Thing is, the Opening Ceremony is under three weeks away. He’s having trouble selling. He’s advertised on craigslist and registered his tickets with the VANOC resale site. But so far, he says, no takers …

1,600 Canadian Dollars
=
1,508.75 United States Dollars
1070.92 Euro
931.13 United Kingdom Pounds
1679.61 Australian Dollars
135,272.13 Japanese Yen
70,010.25 Indian Rupees
114,817.09 Kenya Shillings
11,720.25 Hong Kong Dollars
10,299.15 Chinese Yuan Renminbi
133,297.01 Jamaican Dollars
292,100.82 Hungarian Forint
45,552.67 Russian Rubles
and so on …

Bag Beauty: Splash of Red

In About All Publications, About Image Works on 12/31/2009 at 18:20

Bag beauty struck me on Boxing Day. I was people-watching on Granville Street when I shifted my focus from faces to the shopping bags people were holding. I simultaneously wondered what was in them, saw them as icons of consumerism, and reveled in their beauty. They appeared to me as sculpture, a kaleidoscope of color, poetry. I asked their holders to stop and pose for me.

Three photos from that day are on display in the Red Gallery at Splash of Red: Asbury Park’s Literary Arts Magazine.

Dylan Emerick-Brown, editor-in-chief,  says inspiration for the magazine title comes from several things, including: “the blood and passion that goes into only the most skillfully crafted art” and “great work that stands out just like a splash of red.”

Here’s the direct link: Red Gallery / Karyn Eisler
When you enter the gallery, click on a photo; when it expands, follow the arrow >


Boxing Day Bliss

In Random Curiosities on 12/28/2009 at 22:08

Urban Outfitters. Granville St. 2PM.

I wonder:

How much money did they spend?
Will their deals make them happy?