a dedicated space for curiosity

Posts Tagged ‘Paradox’

War + Peace (in Hungary) > 2 Images

In About All Publications, About Image Works, Treks on 12/05/2012 at 03:17

There’s nothing quite like a private tour of the countryside.

It was May 2012, in the spring heat of Hungary. A local resident took me in his car…

First stop was Sümeg Castle, located in the town of Sümeg, Veszprém, Hungary. The castle sits atop a mountain called “Castle Hill”, about 20 miles north of Lake Balaton. Built in the 13th century by Béla Read the rest of this entry »

The Secret (he thinks) He Keeps: Kindle Edition

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 12/19/2010 at 09:07

Small discoveries are exciting…

A year ago, the Winter 2009 issue of The Battered Suitcase was published online. In it, a story I wrote called The Secret (he thinks) He Keeps. Today, I saw the issue available as an eBook ‘Kindle Edition’ at amazon.com

If your into eBooks, check it out.

The issue is filled with poetry, non/fiction, interviews and art that examine:

“life in all its lovely ambiguity, grittiness, glory and despair…relationships as a means for transformation and the complexity of the human psyche”.

Blog notes that accompanied last year’s publication–poll questions included–are here.

It’s so nice to revisit this work, and to see it available in a new form ~

The Fickle Consumer: PicFic

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 07/23/2010 at 15:07

I find contradictions between morality and ethics interesting–those disconnections that sometimes exist between a person’s notions of right and wrong (or good and bad) and their daily practice of living. Another curiosity is the extent to which people shift their morality retrospectively in light of their behavior and decisions. I find these topics even more compelling when the forces of consumer culture are factored in.

I explore these curiosities in a Twitter length story–140 characters or less. It appears in PicFic–a California-based picofiction online magazine.

Here it is → The Fickle Consumer

(Re)Vision: PicFic

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 07/01/2010 at 19:53

It’s both an honor and thrill to be the invited PicFic Featured Contributor for July.
This means that four of my Twitter-length fictions will appear in PicFic this month, and also on the journal’s Twitter-feed — one per week.

The first in the series is entitled (Re)Vision. The direct link is → here.

Now that’s it’s published, I have a confession:

While (Re)Vision is certainly a story, it’s a bit of a stretch to call it fiction.

Why, you might ask?

Well, the source of (Re)Vision goes back to my childhood, my days in grade school, the era of 70’s television. And when it comes to 70’s TV, it’s no secret that ‘The Brady Bunch’ was IT for me. I blogged about it recently here.

Of all the Brady characters, Jan was my idol — something about her pensive look, her emotions, blonde hair, the braces, her glasses. Jan was cool. No doubt about it. I wanted to be her, so I did what I could:

pensive, emotional → no problem
hair → used a product called ‘Sun In’ to lighten my locks
braces → got them in high school; late, but better than never
glasses → this one took work …

Blinked my eyes incessantly. Closed them hard. Told my parents I couldn’t see. They took me to the ophthalmologist. He tested my eyes, and like clockwork, the plan worked…or so I thought. He said I needed glasses to solve the vision problem. But the blinking issue — a sign of allergies, he said — called for another course of action. He instructed my parents to:

Get. Rid. Of. Our. Dog.

That’s right.

When I confessed to my parents that all was a lie, that I could see very well, that I voluntarily forced the hard blinking, that I loved my dog…they didn’t believe me one bit.

So, I got the wire-rimmed glasses I wanted so badly but didn’t need. And our beloved dog, Scrubby, left our family–went off to a farm for good. We never held him again in our arms–all because of me (and Jan, of course).

Now back to my story Re(Vision):

Karma, perhaps?

3Cheers Award

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 03/19/2010 at 23:02

Wonderful news …

The Curious Practice of Pet-Naming wins a 3Cheers Award!

The story appeared earlier this year in PicFic — a Folded Word Press Twitter-zine.

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The other winners?

Gregory Sherl and Ben Nardolilli

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The prize includes:

the video interpretation above ↑

the “blog bling” below ↓

and the honor, of course.

It’s so nice to hear someone else read my words …

A big thank-you goes out to voters and Folded Word’s California-based Managing Editor, J.S. Graustein.

Secret Beef: 50 to 1

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 02/27/2010 at 20:09

I’ve written about secrets, and taken photos of paradox.

The challenge?

To combine these phenomena in a micro-story of 50 words exactly — no more, no less.

Not long ago, I observed a secret paradox close to home — it concerns business, humans, nonhuman animals, and eating habits.

The story appears in the weekly New Jersey-based e-zine 50 to 1. Editor, Glen Binger,  “posts only 50 word stories and first line inspirational sentences that are meant to get the reader hooked ...”

Here’s the link → Secret Beef

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Olympic (dis)Comfort Zone: Just a Moment

In About All Publications, About Image Works on 02/13/2010 at 08:44

Life is paradoxical; full of contradiction.  The 2010 Olympics in Vancouver are no different.

McDonald’s and Coke are official sponsors; athletes are beacons of health and fitness.  Many oppose the games; scores embrace them. Locals and visitors party in the streets; a competitor dies on the luge track in Whistler.

On opening day I see another paradox — an Olympic (dis)comfort, so to speak.

It appears in just a moment.  The direct link  →  here.

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The Curious Practice of Pet-Naming: PicFic

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 02/03/2010 at 17:07

Some puzzling labels for humans are as follows:

Some men are teddy bears, some women are cougars, some people are pigs (regardless of sex), while others are simply called animals.  In Animal Planet—a postcard story—Rose Hunter provides more examples.

Nonhuman animals themselves are the recipients of perplexing naming practices.

I explore this phenomenon in a Twitter-length fiction—140 characters or less. It appears in PicFic—the Twitter fiction wing of Folded Word Press.

Above, as it appears on Twitter.

And here, as it appears on the PicFic website:  The Curious Practice of Pet-Naming

Another curiosity:

What have you named your companion animal(s)?

The Psychology of Labor: 6S

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 01/26/2010 at 16:41


The Six Sentences [6S] submission guidelines are as follows:

Length:  “six consecutive sentences”

Title:  “should be no longer than 36 characters, including spaces (because 6×6=36)”

Response Time: “all submissions will receive a response within six days”

Clearly, Robert McEvily — “creator and editor of the NY Times recommended writing site Six Sentences” — likes the number six. Figured it might be fun to embrace his challenge of 6’s, so I did.  In six short sentences I explore the complexities of money and work.

Here it is:  The Psychology of Labor

And I wonder:

If a woman, not a man, was the focus of the story, would the zone of depression be reversed?

The Secret (he thinks) He Keeps: The Battered Suitcase

In About All Publications, About Word Works on 12/18/2009 at 08:35

The Battered Suitcase is the flagship publication of Vagabondage Press. The magazine’s mission — to “examines life in all its lovely ambiguity, grittiness, glory and despair.  Chief Editor Fawn Neun and the editorial team express a particular interest in “the question of what it means to be human, the exploration of relationships as a means for transformation and the complexity of the human psyche.”

It’s a thrill to have a super-short fiction of mine appear in this issue:

Here’s the link → The Secret (he thinks) He Keeps

Working on the piece I thought of late Canadian sociologist Erving Goffman, his book The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, and his notion of dramaturgy — the idea that we’re all actors, regardless of whether we do the job in a professional capacity or not. Read the rest of this entry »